This object was sold

independent dead second watch from the second half of the 19th century in very good condition
This watch is in silver, the ratchet key from the same period supplied with is also in silver (it is not the original key.
We can see the high-end manufacturing of this gusset: the movement is decorated with Geneva ribs, the two barrels are decorated with a star, photo 11 shows us the detail of the mustache anchor which is angled and polished mirror without counting the shape of a little man with his two feet, body and arms formed by the two branch of the anchor and the head which is the fork of the anchor.
The escapement wheel, the anchor, the dead second gear and the Breguet curved balance-spring balance wheel are mounted on counter-pivots (distinctive signs of the high quality of this watch)
the white enamel dial in perfect condition is signed on the back.
the three Breguet hands in blued steel are original
we can see on the photos a wear of the pattern engraved on the bottom but this is very acceptable
The hinges on the bottom, dust cover and bezel are in perfect condition.
the watch is guaranteed to function (restored in early January 2020) but I would remind you that it is a collector's watch and not a watch to wear every day because it is an object that remains fragile and not adapted to our daily life. 'today
Precursors of chronographs, watches with a dead second and an independent second appeared in the second half of the 18th century. They allow short times to be measured but do not yet have a reset system.
The measurement of the second and its fractions is relatively old. In 1720, the clockmaker George Graham built a pendulum device beating the second, the hand of which divides the same second into four jumps. In the second half of the 18th century, when the second hand was introduced to pocket watches, watchmakers looked for a device which could immobilize it for taking measurements. The solution consists first of all in stopping the movement, as evidenced by Romilly's second-dead watch (1754) described in Diderot's Encyclopédie: a timepiece fitted with a central hand making one jump per second. In 1776, the Geneva watchmaker Jean Moïse Pouzait filed a memoir describing the principle of an independent second watch. With a second gear train, the second hand can be engaged and stopped at will without disturbing the movement. This type of watch still requires to note the beginning of the measurement and to make a calculation, the second hand cannot be brought to zero. In the 19th century, the optimization of this mechanism and the invention of the "reset" function will lead to the chronograph in its current form.

independent dead second watch from the second half of the 19th century in very good condition<br />
This watch is in silver, the ratchet key from the same period supplied with is also in silver (it is not the original key.<br />
We can see the high-end manufacturing of this gusset: the movement is decorated with Geneva ribs, the two barrels are decorated with a star, photo 11 shows us the detail of the mustache anchor which is angled and polished mirror without counting the shape of a little man with his two feet, body and arms formed by the two branch of the anchor and the head which is the fork of the anchor.<br />
The escapement wheel, the anchor, the dead second gear and the Breguet curved balance-spring balance wheel are mounted on counter-pivots (distinctive signs of the high quality of this watch)<br />
the white enamel dial in perfect condition is signed on the back.<br />
the three Breguet hands in blued steel are original<br />
we can see on the photos a wear of the pattern engraved on the bottom but this is very acceptable<br />
The hinges on the bottom, dust cover and bezel are in perfect condition.<br />
the watch is guaranteed to function (restored in early January 2020) but I would remind you that it is a collector&#39;s watch and not a watch to wear every day because it is an object that remains fragile and not adapted to our daily life. &#39;today<br />
Precursors of chronographs, watches with a dead second and an independent second appeared in the second half of the 18th century. They allow short times to be measured but do not yet have a reset system.<br />
The measurement of the second and its fractions is relatively old. In 1720, the clockmaker George Graham built a pendulum device beating the second, the hand of which divides the same second into four jumps. In the second half of the 18th century, when the second hand was introduced to pocket watches, watchmakers looked for a device which could immobilize it for taking measurements. The solution consists first of all in stopping the movement, as evidenced by Romilly&#39;s second-dead watch (1754) described in Diderot&#39;s Encyclop&eacute;die: a timepiece fitted with a central hand making one jump per second. In 1776, the Geneva watchmaker Jean Mo&iuml;se Pouzait filed a memoir describing the principle of an independent second watch. With a second gear train, the second hand can be engaged and stopped at will without disturbing the movement. This type of watch still requires to note the beginning of the measurement and to make a calculation, the second hand cannot be brought to zero. In the 19th century, the optimization of this mechanism and the invention of the &quot;reset&quot; function will lead to the chronograph in its current form.
pictures.

Object description :

"independent dead second watch from the second half of the 19th century in very good condition
This watch is in silver, the ratchet key from the same period supplied with is also in silver (it is not the original key.
We can see the high-end manufacturing of this gusset: the movement is decorated with Geneva ribs, the two barrels are decorated with a star, photo 11 shows us the detail of the mustache anchor which is angled and polished mirror without counting the shape of a little man with his two feet, body and arms formed by the two branch of the anchor and the head which is the fork of the anchor.
The escapement wheel, the anchor, the dead second gear and the Breguet curved balance-spring balance wheel are mounted on counter-pivots (distinctive signs of the high quality of this watch)
the white enamel dial in perfect condition is signed on the back.
the three Breguet hands in blued steel are original
we can see on the photos a wear of the pattern engraved on the bottom but this is very acceptable
The hinges on the bottom, dust cover and bezel are in perfect condition.
the watch is guaranteed to function (restored in early January 2020) but I would remind you that it is a collector's watch and not a watch to wear every day because it is an object that remains fragile and not adapted to our daily life. 'today
Precursors of chronographs, watches with a dead second and an independent second appeared in the second half of the 18th century. They allow short times to be measured but do not yet have a reset system.
The measurement of the second and its fractions is relatively old. In 1720, the clockmaker George Graham built a pendulum device beating the second, the hand of which divides the same second into four jumps. In the second half of the 18th century, when the second hand was introduced to pocket watches, watchmakers looked for a device which could immobilize it for taking measurements. The solution consists first of all in stopping the movement, as evidenced by Romilly's second-dead watch (1754) described in Diderot's Encyclopédie: a timepiece fitted with a central hand making one jump per second. In 1776, the Geneva watchmaker Jean Moïse Pouzait filed a memoir describing the principle of an independent second watch. With a second gear train, the second hand can be engaged and stopped at will without disturbing the movement. This type of watch still requires to note the beginning of the measurement and to make a calculation, the second hand cannot be brought to zero. In the 19th century, the optimization of this mechanism and the invention of the "reset" function will lead to the chronograph in its current form."
independent dead second watch from the second half of the 19th century in very good condition
This watch is in silver, the ratchet key from the same period supplied with is also in silver (it is not the original key.
We can see the high-end manufacturing of this gusset: the movement is decorated with Geneva ribs, the two barrels are decorated with a star, photo 11 shows us the detail of the mustache anchor which is angled and polished mirror without counting the shape of a little man with his two feet, body and arms formed by the two branch of the anchor and the head which is the fork of the anchor.
The escapement wheel, the anchor, the dead second gear and the Breguet curved balance-spring balance wheel are mounted on counter-pivots (distinctive signs of the high quality of this watch)
the white enamel dial in perfect condition is signed on the back.
the three Breguet hands in blued steel are original
we can see on the photos a wear of the pattern engraved on the bottom but this is very acceptable
The hinges on the bottom, dust cover and bezel are in perfect condition.
the watch is guaranteed to function (restored in early January 2020) but I would remind you that it is a collector's watch and not a watch to wear every day because it is an object that remains fragile and not adapted to our daily life. 'today
Precursors of chronographs, watches with a dead second and an independent second appeared in the second half of the 18th century. They allow short times to be measured but do not yet have a reset system.
The measurement of the second and its fractions is relatively old. In 1720, the clockmaker George Graham built a pendulum device beating the second, the hand of which divides the same second into four jumps. In the second half of the 18th century, when the second hand was introduced to pocket watches, watchmakers looked for a device which could immobilize it for taking measurements. The solution consists first of all in stopping the movement, as evidenced by Romilly's second-dead watch (1754) described in Diderot's Encyclopédie: a timepiece fitted with a central hand making one jump per second. In 1776, the Geneva watchmaker Jean Moïse Pouzait filed a memoir describing the principle of an independent second watch. With a second gear train, the second hand can be engaged and stopped at will without disturbing the movement. This type of watch still requires to note the beginning of the measurement and to make a calculation, the second hand cannot be brought to zero. In the 19th century, the optimization of this mechanism and the invention of the "reset" function will lead to the chronograph in its current form.

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Carriage clocks

independent dead second watch from the second half of the 19th century in very good condition
This watch is in silver, the ratchet key from the same period supplied with is also in silver (it is not the original key.
We can see the high-end manufacturing of this gusset: the movement is decorated with Geneva ribs, the two barrels are decorated with a star, photo 11 shows us the detail of the mustache anchor which is angled and polished mirror without counting the shape of a little man with his two feet, body and arms formed by the two branch of the anchor and the head which is the fork of the anchor.
The escapement wheel, the anchor, the dead second gear and the Breguet curved balance-spring balance wheel are mounted on counter-pivots (distinctive signs of the high quality of this watch)
the white enamel dial in perfect condition is signed on the back.
the three Breguet hands in blued steel are original
we can see on the photos a wear of the pattern engraved on the bottom but this is very acceptable
The hinges on the bottom, dust cover and bezel are in perfect condition.
the watch is guaranteed to function (restored in early January 2020) but I would remind you that it is a collector's watch and not a watch to wear every day because it is an object that remains fragile and not adapted to our daily life. 'today
Precursors of chronographs, watches with a dead second and an independent second appeared in the second half of the 18th century. They allow short times to be measured but do not yet have a reset system.
The measurement of the second and its fractions is relatively old. In 1720, the clockmaker George Graham built a pendulum device beating the second, the hand of which divides the same second into four jumps. In the second half of the 18th century, when the second hand was introduced to pocket watches, watchmakers looked for a device which could immobilize it for taking measurements. The solution consists first of all in stopping the movement, as evidenced by Romilly's second-dead watch (1754) described in Diderot's Encyclopédie: a timepiece fitted with a central hand making one jump per second. In 1776, the Geneva watchmaker Jean Moïse Pouzait filed a memoir describing the principle of an independent second watch. With a second gear train, the second hand can be engaged and stopped at will without disturbing the movement. This type of watch still requires to note the beginning of the measurement and to make a calculation, the second hand cannot be brought to zero. In the 19th century, the optimization of this mechanism and the invention of the "reset" function will lead to the chronograph in its current form.
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